Survivors

Survivors
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  • Barbara
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  • I am a cancer survivor
  • Hi, I\^m a New Zealander and I\^m now 43. It\^s interesting reading your stories. I was diagnosed with stage 1a cervical cancer when I was 32. I had a radical hysterectomy through laproscopy. God it was a difficult time as I was a single parent with a 14 year old wayward daughter! They told me it would take 6 weeks to heal, but in reality it took 6 months of physical pain and emotional grieving (even though I didn\^t want more kids).

    I never had symptoms, just a vague intuition that something wasn\^t right. When I lay down to sleep at night the only part of me that wouldn\^t relax was (if your familiar with chakras or energy centres) the base chakra just above my pubic bone.

    I had a smear which came back postitive and the rest is as above. 18 months after the hysterectomy, I felt tired all the time for no particular reason and again the instincts kicked and off to the Dr I went. I asked her to give me a liver function test. It came back only slightly abnormal (raised gamma gts) so she said it was nothing to worry about. (I don\^t trust Doctors in this country. There are some great ones, but you can\^t sue them here if they mistreat you because of the Accident Compensation Act. Consequently, there is much \^she\^ll be right\^ complacency in the New Zealand medical profession.) I said it\^s not normal so send me for an ultra sound of my liver. Lo and behold there it was a 9cm mesenchymal tumour attached to my gall bladder and liver. I had the right lobe of my liver and gall bladder removed (your liver is the only organ which will regenerate to it\^s original size!) and recovered.

    The specialists were not gyno-oncologists and they believed it was rare and only 6 people in the world have had this type of tumour. They also said it wasn\^t related to the cervical cancer. It was huge and vascular but benign.(Phew).

    Well I guess the side effects from the hysterectomy were lymphodema in the pubic area and left leg. This has improved over time and I now have a partner and sex is good.

    Lately though, over the past three months, I have had bone pain in the pubic bone. It has progressed quickly over the past three months and the female doctor I have seen has fobbed me off and prescribed paradex for pain which just doesn\^t work at all. I\^m currently taken diclofenac (voltaren) but thats not effective either and although it works marginally during the day when I\^m at work at the office, I wake up in agony in the middle of the night.

    I\^ve been trawling the internet for clues on what could be the problem because I\^ve had lower back and hip pain for a few years now which is slowly worsening.

    I\^m now seeing a male Dr who is more proactive. He is sending me for a pelvic ultrasound and mentioned a nuclear bone scan. I had an xray and some bloods taken last week and hopefully I find out the results of those tomorrow and I may ask if he will prescribe some Tamadol which my sister who works for Pfizer has suggested I ask him for.

    I guess it\^s like this: I may have recurrent cervical cancer that has metastisized to my pubic bone or I may have Osteitis Pubis or Osteomylitis. (both diseases that affect your pubic bone that surgery ten years ago may have caused).

    One bit of advice that I can give you all is don\^t take no for an answer from your doctor! Sometimes they just don\^t give a damn and it\^s easier to give you a bogus explanation like your\^e hypersensitive to pain! What bollocks! You know your body and you need to demand investigative treatments. Trust your intuition and be as postive as you can. Read Ramtha and The Secret and don\^t give up!

    New Zealand is a beautiful place (it\^s nuclear free and we are largely pacifists or peacemakers!) I live in the South Island of New Zealand in Oamaru, North Otago. I live with someone I waited a lifetime to meet and I won\^t give him up for cancer. My daughter is 24 and has 2 kids of her own now. She\^s no longer wayward and is studying to be a jeweller. I\^m an administrator for a NZ Newspaper and I\^m studying part-time to be a journalist. Life is good, don\^t let less than professional standards jeopardise your survival, it\^s tough when they get 10 minutes in an appointment to diagnose or think about what could be seriously wrong or a rare condition! Be agressive if you need to and don\^t let a Dr fob you off! Find another one!

    I\^ll let you know what the diagnoses is after all the tests.

    Keep the faith and savour your every day above ground!

    Barb
  • 06-23 -2008
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